Naturopathic Approaches to Type 2 Diabetes – How to Regulate Blood Sugar Naturally

Join Chris Habib, B.Sc. (Hons), ND to learn how powerful naturopathic medicine can be for Type 2 Diabetes!

During this jam packed webinar Dr. Habib will cover:
How to improve blood sugar regulation naturally
– Common supplements for diabetes and related complications
– Diet and lifestyle approaches for Type 2 Diabetes
– A patient who was safely able to go off diabetes medication with ND supervision

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

Register Now!

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To view the archive of past webinar recordings, please click here.


About the Presenter

Educated at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine as an evidence-based naturopathic doctor, Chris Habib, B.Sc. (Hons), ND is the Chief Financial Officer of a highly successful herb company. He is an entrepreneur and investor who has bought and sold numerous businesses. Dr. Habib also manages health clinics, teaches, works in telemedicine, and oversees an online medical publication.

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*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

Naturopathic Nutrition Therapy

Across cultures, borders, and ethnic lines, people around the world hold a deep personal connection to food. The emotional bond that people have to the foods they love is multilayered. Food brings people together, adding merriment, joy and interest to a variety of occasions from a quiet family dinner at home, to a rousing culinary exploration of a new restaurant with friends, religious and cultural traditions, or landmark life events like weddings and graduations. A home-cooked meal can also be associated with a show of affection. Nutrition plays a pivotal role in the journey towards optimal health and well-being. The personal and emotional connections people have to the foods that they eat are among the chief reasons why nutritional change is such a challenge, even in the face of medical necessity or chronic disease risk.

Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and disability in the US and are also among the most costly and preventable.1 About half of all American adults—117 million individuals—have one or more preventable chronic diseases, many of which are related to poor eating patterns.2 The health risk factors of physical inactivity, tobacco use and exposure and poor nutrition are the leading causes of chronic disease.1 It is also interesting to note that in the face of skyrocketing rates of chronic diseases that have a strong nutritional component such as Type II diabetes, obesity, and heart disease, most conventional medical providers are not adequately trained to address nutritional habits in a way that sufficiently supports their patients in making foundational, permanent changes that could help improve overall vitality or slow disease development or propagation.

Physicians trained through conventional medical training receive only a nominal amount of nutrition education. In a 2015 study, researchers surveyed all 133 four-year conventional medical programs in the US and found that out of 121 medical schools that responded, about 71% provide less than 25 hours of nutrition education with 36% providing less than 12 hours and less than half of all schools report teaching any nutrition in clinical practice with clinical nutrition practice accounting for an average of only 4.7 hours overall.3 In contrast, the nutrition curriculum in naturopathic medical school is centered on a series of rigorous, evidence informed nutrition courses that offer a cumulative base of knowledge that is built over the entire four-year education program. Naturopathic medical curricula at a four-year, accredited college of naturopathic medicine includes an average of 155 hours of classroom nutrition education coupled with over 1200 hours of clinical education wherein application of nutrition principles is a foundational component of nearly every patient interaction.4

At four-year accredited naturopathic medical schools, nutrition education includes specific training in a broad array of nutritional principles. Having an in-depth knowledge of each, along with an understanding of how they all fit together, coupled with many hours of clinical application leads naturopathic physicians to be among the most highly skilled medical practitioners. NDs are expert in the development and implementation of individualized, tailored nutritional prescriptions that support patient outcomes and empower patients to execute better nutrition choices. Optimized nutrition forms the foundation for health across all aspects of physical, emotional, spiritual, and intellectual health. Some examples of naturopathic nutrition training include intensive study of:

Dietary Analysis and Assessment

Dietary Analysis and Assessment is the comprehensive evaluation of nutrient intake including intensive study of various nutrition therapies and their evidentiary support in medical research and clinical observations as well as determining individual micro- and macro- nutrient needs based on individual factors, evaluation of what current intakes of macro- and micronutrients are given the individual dietary intake as a means of establishing a basis for nutrient deficiencies, excesses, imbalances, or other dysfunction including outright nutrition based pathologies.

Clinical and Specialized Nutrition Therapy

Clinical and Specialized Nutrition Therapy is an application of nutrition principles, protocols, and evidence based dietary systems (i.e. Mediterranean diet) for individual health concerns and conditions. NDs utilize specific nutrients in patient management, providing nutrition therapy to specialty sub-populations like nursing mothers, pediatrics, performance athletes, disordered eating, metabolic syndrome, and others.

Nutritional therapy is core to comprehensive naturopathic care. With the goal of restoring balance through appropriate nourishment, it is focused on promoting vitality and well-being through the use of specific, individual dietary interventions, use of therapeutic, personalized dietary prescriptions, and can also include the use of herbs, supplements, and functional foods as well. The impact of the foods we are exposed to plays a direct role in our health from preconception to death. The foods we choose to eat on a daily basis can have important effects related to disease susceptibility, proper physical, mental, and intellectual development, inflammation and immunity. Whether these effects are taking us in a positive direction or a negative one depends on the choices we make.

The role that nutrition plays in not only the restoration of health but also the maintenance of health cannot be overstated. Going back as far as the times of Hippocrates, it was the steadfast belief that food should be the primary medicine. In the last century we have seen a drastic drop in infectious disease and much lower rates of nutrient deficiencies, but this came with a trade-off.2 As infectious disease rates have dropped, the rates of noncommunicable diseases—specifically, chronic diet-related diseases, have risen, due in part to changes in lifestyle behaviors.2 At a population level, the quality of the American diet has drastically decreased over time with 60% of calorie consumption coming from ultra-processed foods (packaged formulations resulting from several sequences of industrial processes).5 Unfortunately, a loss of connection to where our food comes from, and to the value of fresh, seasonal, local food means that many people have also lost sight of the notion that the foods we eat are actually fuel for the body, and that the purpose of food is not only for enjoyment but also to provide the body with what it needs to function optimally and provide the best opportunity for maximal overall health, well-being, and longevity.

Macro- and Micronutrient Therapy

Macro and Micronutrient Therapy incorporates learning the nutritional biochemistry behind macro- and micronutrients, the importance of an individualized balance of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates as well as daily requirements of vitamins and minerals. NDs guide patients to good sources of various micronutrients, information on the utilization of optimal ratios for nutrients and nutrient subtypes, how micronutrients are absorbed and assimilated, what can be done to support optimal absorption and assimilation, how our DNA impacts our nutrition, micronutrient, and vitamin needs, as well as knowledge surrounding deficiency, storage, excretion, and toxicity.

Naturopathic physicians are a key guide, leading patients to life-long prevention and wellness through individualized, whole-person-focused nutrition.

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

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Fig 101: The Naturopathic Kitchen

Welcome back to The Naturopathic Kitchen! Each week we go back to the basics to use food as medicine in order to lead healthier lives. It can be intimidating to try new things especially when you don’t know what it is good for or how to prepare/cook it. Today we’ll be figuring out figs!

Figs 101

Are Fig Newtons or figgy pudding the first thing that comes to mind when you think fig? Let’s change that association! As one of the sweetest fruits available, figs are a great way to sweeten a dessert or add variety to any healthy dish.

Where do figs come from? Where can I find them?

Figs have a long history of use dating back as far as 5000 BC and is said to be one of the first fruits ever cultivated by humans. Figs were so popular in ancient Greece, that laws were enacted to prevent exportation. They are also a major part of the Mediterranean Diet which is considered one of the healthiest diets in the world.

Figs are the fruit of the fig tree and are actually inverted flowers. The flesh of the fig fruit is made from the mature flower, which blooms inside the skin and is never seen like a traditional flower.

Figs are easily found fresh in most major grocery stores between mid-June and mid-October. They can be purchased year-long dried, frozen or in jams.

How do figs help my health?

Naturally high in essential nutrients and fiber, figs are considered a very nutrient-dense fruit. Like other tree fruits, figs contain high amounts of polyphenols—a free radical scavenging family of compounds, as well as potassium, vitamin K, vitamin C, and various trace minerals. Research has shown figs help with conditions such as: liver disease, diabetes, anemia, skin cancer, and may even reduce skin wrinkles from aging. 1,2,3,4

What medical conditions/symptoms are figs used for?

When should fig be avoided?

Since figs can lower blood sugar, you should monitor your blood sugar closely when taking insulin for diabetes. Figs should also be avoided 2 weeks prior to surgery for this same reason.

 

Let’s try out some flavorful fig recipes!

 

Grilled Brie Stuffed Figs with Honey

INGREDIENTS

8 fresh figs
1/4 wedge of brie cheese, cut into small 1/2-inch cubes
organic cold pressed olive oil
2-3 grill skewers
Honey
Freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat the grill and make sure the surface is clean. Soak wooden skewers (if you are using wood). Press the figs onto the skewers. Lightly brush each side with olive oil. Grill until softened with the lid on the grill up so they don’t overheat and burst. When cooked, turn them inside and cool for five minutes. Remove from skewers. Make cross-shaped cuts from the top-down midway into the fig. Stuff with the brie cheese. Drizzle with honey and sprinkle cracked pepper on top to taste.

Thank you to Garden and Table for this recipe!

 

Balsamic and Mustard Glazed Chicken and Figs

INGREDIENTS

1/2 c balsamic vinegar
2 T Dijon mustard
2 T olive oil, divided
1 T honey
1 T coarsely chopped fresh sage leaves
2 cloves
garlic, minced
2 lbs. bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs or breasts (4 – 6)
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
8 fresh figs, halve

INSTRUCTIONS

Place a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 350°F. To make the glaze, whisk the vinegar, mustard, 1 tablespoon of olive oil, honey, sage and garlic together in a small bowl; set aside. Pat the chicken dry with paper towels and season both sides with salt and pepper. Heat the remaining olive oil in a large cast iron or oven-safe skillet over medium-high heat until the oil is shimmering but not smoking. Add the chicken skin-side down and cook until the skin is crisp and golden-brown, 6 to 8 minutes. Flip the chicken and scatter the figs around it. Carefully pour the glaze evenly over the chicken and figs. Transfer the skillet to the oven and cook, spooning some of the glaze in the skillet back over the chicken halfway through, until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 165°F, 10 to 12 minutes total. Serve the chicken with the sauce.

Thank you to kitchn for this recipe!

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Naturopathic Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes

Join Dr. Ryan Bradley for a provocative presentation focused on naturopathic approaches to type 2 diabetes prevention and management.

Naturopathic Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes

Here’s what you can expect to learn from this webinar:
– Statistics on diabetes care in the United States
– Evidence regarding naturopathic concepts of disease in diabetes
– Example of evidence-based clinical nutrition, herbal medicine and general naturopathic treatment protocols
– Patient example of evidence-based management of type 2 diabetes

Click here to learn more about naturopathic approaches to diabetes management.

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

Receive information from the accredited schools of your choice located across North America!

Naturopathic Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes

This provocative presentation will focus on the roles naturopathic doctors have in type 2 diabetes management. Other topics that will be discussed include:
– Review statistics on diabetes care in the United States
– Summarize evidence regarding naturopathic concepts of disease in diabetes
– Provide example evidence-based clinical nutrition, herbal medicine and general naturopathic treatment protocols
– Patient example of evidence-based management of type 2 diabetes

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

 

Register Now!

*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

To view the archive of past webinar recordings, please click here.


About the Presenter

Ryan Bradley, ND, MPH received his Doctor of Naturopathy (ND) from Bastyr University in 2003 and his Master of Public Health (MPH) in Epidemiology from the University of Washington in 2009. He is licensed in Washington, Oregon and California and maintains a private practice in addition to his research and teaching in academia. His primary academic appointment is as the Director of Research and Associate Professor at the National University of Natural Medicine (NUNM) in Portland, OR. Dr. Bradley and his team at the Helfgott Research Institute were recently awarded a $1 million research grant by National Institutes of Health, through the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) along with two other institutes. Dr. Bradley is also faculty in the Division of Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), an Affiliate Associate Professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, and a Visiting Professor at the University of Technology, Sydney in Sydney, Australia. Dr. Bradley has conducted a wide-variety of epidemiologic, translational and practice-based research focused on complementary and integrative medicine, and has published in leading peer-reviewed medical journals. He is a highly-rated international speaker on naturopathic medicine, integrative medicine research, and clinical cardio-renal-metabolic disorders. When not working, Dr. Bradley enjoys all things in nature.

Read about Dr. Bradley’s type 2 diabetes study.

Register Now!

*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .