Make the Dream a Reality! How to Become an ND

Looking for a career that’s not just a job, but a passion and a calling? Do you have questions about affording ND school, how to apply, how others have made it work? Then join Shannon Svingen- Jones – Dean of Student Affairs at Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine and Eve Adams – Director of Admissions at Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine for a free and inspiring information session on how to make your dream of becoming a naturopathic doctor a reality.

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

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About the Presenters – Eve Adams

A long-time advocate of naturopathic medicine, Eve Adams is proud to be a member of the SCNM community. Prior to joining SCNM, she worked at Valley of the Sun United Way in development. Eve graduated from Arizona State University with a bachelor’s degree in communication and nonprofit management. She is actively involved with a number of community and non-profit organizations. In her spare time she enjoys practicing yoga, hiking and exploring the beautiful state of Arizona.

It’s so rewarding to help students fulfill their dreams of being the kind of doctor that will truly change a patient’s life!

 


About the Presenters – Shannon Svingen- Jones

Shannon Svingen-Jones has over 15 years of academic leadership experience in post secondary educational settings. As Dean of Student Services her primary role is to respond to students needs and offer quality programming that is committed to student success both academically and personally. Shannon is part of the senior leadership team that is responsible for the high quality of student life on campus and she acts as a liaison between the college administrators and student organizations.

 

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*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

Dr. JoAnn Yanez on KCAA 02/13/19

Dr. JoAnn Yanez, AANMC executive director, joins KCAA’s NBC LA affiliate On the Brink to discuss the relationship between depression and heart disease.
 

 

Full Transcript of Interview Below.

Topics Include:

  • Gender impacts on health
  • Stress and its relationship with heart health
  • Adaption to stress
  • Positivity and gratitude
  • And More…

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: As I was preparing for this morning and thinking about it, something kept popping up in my head and maybe it’s because I’m getting sentimental with my old age and Valentine’s Day, but I was thinking about the role of our minds and our thoughts on the heart and figured, hey everybody talks about heart disease and how you should eat well and you should exercise and some of the things that are better for managing heart disease and preventing heart disease like the Mediterranean diet. I know we’ve talked about that before. How do we do something different today? I thought maybe we would connect the relationship with depression and heart disease.

Erin Brinker: Oh, I think that’s wonderful.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Is that okay?

Erin Brinker: Yes, I think that’s wonderful. Absolutely.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: I was looking at the statistics and heart disease still remains the number one killer of folks in the United States, one out of every four deaths. It is very important to understand but one of the lesser talked about issues in heart disease is that folks with heart disease, heart patients, are three times as likely to be depressed at any given time than the general population. I found that really interesting and depression is also twice as common in women than men.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: One of the things that kept coming into my mind and I always look at illness and all patient issues with a naturopathic lens, is how does our role with stress, how does our role with how we handle things, why is depression twice as likely in women than men? Is our existence that much more depressing than the male experience? What is that about?

Erin Brinker: I wonder if women are more likely to recognize their depression and ask for assistance than men are.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: That definitely is part of it. There’s a lot of stigma around men feeling weak or showing “weakness” and anything mental can be considered weakness. You know, “tough it up, be a man,”  that whole culture of having to try and stiff upper lip everything and hold it in actually impacts so many different components of our health. I’ve talked before about the role of cortisol and stress in our talks here in the morning, but stress impacts our release of cortisol which is a hormone and that has so many different ripples in the body, some of which can worsen heart disease if it’s already present or exacerbate incidents of heart disease. Cortisol, that’s your stress hormone, that’s ‘run from the bear in the woods’ kind of thing and what does it do? It increases your heart rate, it increases blood sugar levels, which subsequently can have increased damage on your vascular system. There’s a lot of ripples and a connection between stress and heart disease that isn’t often talked about or addressed.

Erin Brinker: I know that people who deal with chronic pain can become depressed because the presence of pain that’s with you all the time is depressing. I mean, I’ve known enough people who have had like back pain and they really fight depression. Is this a chicken and the egg thing? Does the depression come first and then the heart disease or the heart disease and then the depression, or does that really matter?

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: I think it depends on the patient, Erin. There are so many different factors and I don’t think that we can say there’s just a one size fits all reason why folks have cardiovascular disease and it’s the number one killer. I would say that diet is definitely, at least in the United States, a major component, but what happens when folks are depressed? Depression in and of itself lends you to not want to exercise, not want to get out and talk to friends, and self-isolate, maybe grab more carb heavy foods, and things that will increase your weight and increase your blood pressure. It becomes this vicious cycle that just continues to feed itself. I don’t know that we can pinpoint any one thing but being depressed will … How motivated are you if you’re feeling down to go out and exercise? Funny thing is that’s exactly what you should do when you’re feeling down, like get out, get out of the house, don’t sit and mope and wallow in it. Go take a walk, go call a friend. I think there are many better adaptive coping mechanisms that we can do to our stressors but some of that just is around how do we adapt to stress. If you’re stressed do you instantly go to like anger or anxiety? Research has shown that the folks that when they’re stressed, they go to anger and anxiety, they have higher levels of heart disease.

Erin Brinker: Interesting.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: How we manage our stress is also important. Recognizing the things that get you stressed out … I can tell you mornings stress me out. Getting a six-year-old up and out the door …

Erin Brinker: Ah, yes.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Getting ready for school stresses me out and so what I’ve tried to do, what we’ve tried to do in the house, is do as many things ahead of time so get the clothes out, make breakfast the night before or have things that are quick and easy to grab for breakfast and get a routine set so that we can head off at the path at least some of the things that will lead to more stress. Some things are going to be in our control and then there are going to be things that are not in our control and we still have to manage how do we respond to that; do we find the silver lining or do we mope and wallow in it. Yesterday, I was having a morning yesterday like it sounds like you guys are having today and I ended up … I had just gotten back into town after a week away, breakfast wasn’t made, and so I found myself running out the door to try and go grab breakfast at a store for my son, leave the house without my purse.

Erin Brinker: I have had … That has happened to me and you just want to cry. Oh, my goodness, I am so sorry that happened to you.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Well, but like in that moment of like okay, I’ve got a hungry kid, he has to eat, I’ve got no purse, like what do we do? Okay, what do we have in the car? Then I realized that I had some emergency cash stowed away in a pocket, like ah, okay. But like you could, you could just sit and just give up and cry or you can just go into alright, how do we make the best out of it?

Erin Brinker: Right.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Go ahead.

Erin Brinker: One of the things about depression is that you do isolate yourself and the people around you may not know how to say … How to pull you out, to help you work through that stress. I had a pretty stressful day yesterday and Tobin makes me laugh when I’m stressed, even if it irritates me a little bit when he starts, by the time he’s done I’m really happy that he did it and so I think we need to be cognizant of what those around us are feeling and going through and we can help.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Absolutely. You know, there’s so much, and we’ve talked about this before, check in on your friends. Recently, I’ve had several friends lose parents and loved ones and you make check on them initially, but check on them in a week or two or a month later. Keep checking on your friends, keep making sure that they’re okay. Stop in, make them laugh, take them to a funny movie. Do those types of things that will help elevate and just be a good human being, I think at the end of the day.

Erin Brinker: Just start there.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Start there, be a good human. You wish you didn’t have to tell that to people but you know.

Erin Brinker: You know, we get … I know when I get busy, I get tunnel vision and it’s a good reminder to say hey, have you checked in on your friends lately? Have you sent a note and said I’m thinking about you? It’s so easy to do with a text or social media post or whatever, it’s so easy to reach out to people now.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: It really is. I think, again, it’s just we all get tunnel vision, we all get caught up in our day to day and making a choice to stop and check in on your friends and also stop and check in on yourself. That’s one of the things that I think when people get really busy and caught up, it’s easy to ignore feelings and how you’re doing and your attitude, really impact your emotional state. We can sit and focus and dwell on the things that are missing in our life until the cows come home. We can think about all the things we don’t have, all of the stuff that we wish we had, all the things we would want to have, or we can focus on the blessings we do have right here and right now. That practice of positivity and of gratitude … Yesterday I was having kind of one of those days and I forced myself before I went to bed, I’m like okay, focus on the things that you’re thankful for. What are the good things in your life and leave those as the last thoughts you have before you go to sleep.

Erin Brinker: Oh, that’s beautiful. That’s beautiful. An attitude of gratitude is a game changer, it really is.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: It really is and it has been for me. I always joke, I come from a long line of worriers and anxious people, so it’s long bred in my family to be anxious and so I consciously have to say okay, you’re going a little too far on one side on this Jo, come on back, remember the things that you do have, remember the blessings, and be thankful for those because you’ve got it pretty good compared to a whole lot. Not to brag, but we have a house, we have a roof over our head, we’ve got food in the fridge, you know I’ve got family that loves me. That’s a really good place to start.

Erin Brinker: Indeed, and that will be our last word for today. Let people know how they can find you and follow you and learn more about the Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: You bet. We’re all over the interweb, AANMC.org, on social media, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, etc. Please reach out to us. We host monthly webinars on varying topics and we’ve got one coming up on PCOS, polycystic ovary syndrome, so hope you guys can tune in.

Erin Brinker: Oh, that’s great. Well, Dr. JoAnn Yanez, it’s always, always a treat to have you on the air. Thank you so much for joining us.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Thank you. Hope you guys have a better day.

Erin Brinker: Thank you. It’s already getting better, it’s already better.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Awesome.

Erin Brinker: Thank you so much.

Dr. JoAnn Yanez: Bye.

Erin Brinker: Bye. It’s time for a break. I’m Erin Brinker.

Tobin Brinker: I’m Tobin Brinker.

Erin Brinker: We’ll be right back.

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

Click below to receive information from the seven accredited naturopathic medical schools across eight North American campuses!

Chia Seed 101: The Naturopathic Kitchen

Welcome back to The Naturopathic Kitchen, your go-to place to learn about incorporating healthy foods into your life. In today’s installment, we will take a closer look at the ancient staple and modern superfood known as chia.

Chia Seed 101

A long-ignored member of the mint family, chia seeds, often simply called “chia,” may be more associated with “Chia Pet” fame than food, however the tiny black or white seeds are actually nutritional powerhouses that have been used as a source of food and medicine for over 5,500 years. There is evidence that chia was initially used by Pre-Columbian civilizations like the Aztecs and Mayans as early as 3500 BC. It is also believed that chia was among the staple components of the Aztec and Mayan diet and became a major cash crop of the region. With its wealth of nutrients including essential omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, protein, minerals like calcium, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus as well as vitamins like thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin, chia is highly nutritious and could be easily stored or transported for consumption on long trips. Chia was also well known for improving stamina and endurance. Not surprisingly, the word “chia” is from the Mayan word for strength.

Where does chia seed come from? Where can I find it?

With its surge in popularity as a modern “superfood,” chia is widely available at supermarkets and health food stores. Despite being a cash crop since 1500 BC, cultivation of chia was very limited until the last thirty years when a group of scientists, nutritionists, and agriculturists collaborating to revive lost nutritional plants of the Pre-Columbian era began promoting its cultivation. Traditionally, chia is grown in Central and South America, though today Australia is the largest contributor to the supply of commercial chia growing over 90% of the world’s supply.

Chia seeds have a very mild flavor and are used in both savory and sweet dishes where they contribute more to crunch and texture than flavor.  When combined with liquid and allowed to soak, chia forms a gel making them a favorite vegan egg substitute as well. Chia seeds can be eaten whole without the need to be ground which makes preparation very easy. They can be eaten raw, soaked in juice, added to pudding, smoothies or baked goods as well as sprinkled on yogurt, salads or vegetables.

How do chia seeds help my health?

Don’t be fooled by their tiny size, chia seeds are ounce for ounce among the most nutritious foods on the planet. Chia is the best source of essential omega-3 fats in the plant kingdom and has been shown to have positive impact on heart health and cholesterol levels.1 These same fatty acids also have anti-inflammatory activity.2 Chia seeds can also improve blood sugar control and reduce blood sugar spikes associated with consuming carbohydrate rich foods like bread.3,4 Chia seeds are loaded with nutrients that can have numerous benefits to the body and brain.

What medical conditions/symptoms are chia seeds used for?

Blood Sugar Management

Reduced Body Fat

Athletic Performance

Manage Blood Pressure

Protect Cardiovascular Health

Improve Chemotherapy Efficacy

When should chia seeds be avoided?

Chia seeds are generally recognized as safe, but some groups should be aware of potential interactions. Because of its high omega-3 content, chia can impact blood clotting. Those taking blood clotting medications should speak to their doctor before adding chia seeds to their diet. Additionally, those with sensitivities to mustard, sesame seeds, or herbs like oregano and thyme may also react to chia. Patients with certain bowel diseases may also need to avoid chia seeds. Check with your doctor if you are unsure.

Let’s try out chia seeds with these tasty recipes!

Chocolate-Coconut Chia Seed Mousse

INGREDIENTS

1/4 c chia seeds (black or white)
1 can full-fat coconut milk
2 T coconut butter (not coconut oil)
4-5 T maple syrup, to taste
1/2 t vanilla extract
1/3 c cacao powder
pinch of sea salt
Optional toppings: raw sliced almonds, raw coconut flakes/chips

INSTRUCTIONS

Process the chia seeds in a coffee grinder for about 20 seconds or until ground to a fine powder. Whisk and set aside. In a large food processor, process the coconut milk, coconut butter, maple syrup, the seeds, vanilla, and a pinch of sea salt until lightly incorporated. Add cacao powder and process until completely smooth, scraping down the sides. Measure out 1/4 cup of the chia seed powder (you will have some left over) and add it to the food processor. Continue to process until the pudding is smooth and no clumps remain. Pour the mixture into individual ramekins or bowls. Refrigerate for a full 24 hours before serving. To serve, toast a handful of sliced almonds and raw coconut flakes in a skillet over medium heat until lightly browned. Careful — both ingredients burn easily. Top the chocolate mousse with the toasted almonds and coconut. Serve.

Thank you to veggiesandgin.com for this wonderful recipe!

Protein Lemon-Chia Seed Pancakes

INGREDIENTS

2 egg whites
1 scoop vanilla protein powder
2 organic bananas
1 t chia seeds
1/8 t vanilla extract
1/2 t baking powder
1/2 t lemon zest
1 T fresh lemon juice
1 T oat flour (or all-purpose flour)

INSTRUCTIONS

In a medium bowl, smash the bananas with a fork. Add the remaining of the ingredients and combine all ingredients until smooth. Heat a small nonstick pan over medium/low and coat with cooking spray. Pour 1/4 cup of the batter onto the pan. Cook until bubbles break the surface of the pancakes, and the undersides are golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip with a spatula and cook about 1 minute more on the second side.

Thank you to muydelish.com for this tasty recipe!

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

Click below to receive information from the seven accredited naturopathic medical schools across eight North American campuses!

Tips for Eating Mindfully

Tips for Eating Mindfully

Did you know that 1 in 3 Americans can’t eat without their phone? Distracted eating can lead to eating up to 50% more! Our choices of what, when, why and where we eat may be influenced by distractions. Renowned nutrition expert, Dr. Jennifer Botwick will discuss how to improve your nutrition and how to make non-judgmental food choices that are best for your body.

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

Click below to receive information from the seven accredited naturopathic medical schools across eight North American campuses!

Tips for Eating Mindfully

Did you know that 1 in 3 Americans can’t eat without their phone? Distracted eating can lead to eating up to 50% more! Our choices of what, when, why and where we eat may be influenced by distractions. During this free forum, attendees can learn about mindfulness for a healthier relationship with food. Renowned nutrition expert, Dr. Jennifer Botwick will discuss how to improve your nutrition and how to make non-judgmental food choices that are best for your body right now.

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

Register Now!

*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

To view the archive of past webinar recordings, please click here.


About the Presenter

Jennifer Botwick, ND is a licensed naturopathic doctor in the state of Connecticut. She maintains a private practice in Woodbridge, CT and is an adjunct professor in the Department of Public Health at Southern Connecticut State University. Dr. Botwick recently retired as clinical supervisor and adjunct faculty from the University of Bridgeport School of Naturopathic Medicine. She continues to teach mindfulness to teen and adult learners. Bringing patients to a place of ease while helping them pursue optimal health is a core focus of Dr. Botwick’s practice.

Register Now!

*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .