Natural Approaches to IBS and a Healthy Gut

With a worldwide prevalence of 10-20%, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an exceedingly common bowel disorder that often occurs with a variety of other conditions. Join the AANMC and Dr. Thor Conner to learn why naturopathic doctors view gut health as core to good patient care, and what NDs can offer those living with intestinal conditions.

Dr. Conner will cover:
– How IBS is diagnosed and treated
– How gastrointestinal (GI) function contributes to other aspects of overall health
– Nutrition and lifestyle approaches to improve gut health
– A patient case study

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

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To view the archive of past webinar recordings, please click here.


About the Presenter

Wm. Thor Conner, ND,CNS,LMT received his naturopathic medical degree from National University of Health Sciences and his massage certificate from the Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy. Dr. Conner operates a private practice – WorldTree Natural Medicine in Oakbrook Terrace, IL. Combining physical medicine, counseling, and knowledge of natural therapies, Dr. Conner is dedicated to educating and improving the health of his patients and the planet through the healing power of nature.

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*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter and Humor

Few things are as emotionally satisfying as a good belly laugh. Many people became familiar with laughter as medicine thanks to the work of Robin Williams in the movie Patch Adams. Based on a true story, Dr. Hunter “Patch” Adams established the Gesundheit Institute dedicated to spreading humor, laughter, and joy to patients.

“There is so much literature specific to the beneficial effects of humor on health, but one truly advantageous benefit that is often missed is the impact on the doctor patient relationship. We are social individuals by nature, and humor is such an efficacious tool to allow a patient to feel comfortable and establish a sense of connection.  Humor has the ability to transform a dry and stagnant interaction to one that embodies the opportunity for trust, conversation and most importantly, compliance.  Patients want a chance to be heard and be themselves: a good joke, laugh, and smile is many times the simple answer!”

Joseph Vazquez, ND

Assistant Professor and Attending Clinician, National University of Health Sciences

Experiencing optimal health is a multifactorial process, usually thought of involving a healthy diet, exercise program, and other lifestyle choices. Laughter is a universal characteristic of all humans, and having a sense of humor and finding opportunities to laugh have been linked to better overall health, both mentally and physically. Everyone enjoys a good laugh. Here are some ways laughter can help you live a healthier and happier life!

Psychological Health

Mood

Not surprisingly, humor and laughter are great for the mood. Many studies have shown that laughter and humor are excellent stress relievers and effective at lowering anxiety by increasing levels of the “happy” brain chemicals, dopamine and serotonin. Cortisol and epinephrine (the stress hormones) decrease with laughter. A study involving “laughing yoga” classes, found that participants reported increased vigor and reduced tension. 1,2 Laughter has also been shown to alleviate depression and improve sleep quality. 3

Quality of Life

The stress of caring for sick loved ones is well-documented. Laughter therapy has been used to improve the psychological health of HIV patient caregivers. 4 Nursing home patients also saw improvement in quality of life markers with just a little levity. 5 Laughter therapy has also been shown to significantly improve the quality of life in cancer patients. 6

Cognitive Health

Laughter even has a beneficial effect on cognitive health.  In one study, watching humorous videos improved short term memory, learning and visual recognition in elderly diabetic patients. 7 And of course, laughter is a fundamental way of connecting socially and improves relationships across the board. 8

Physical Benefits

Pain Reduction

Laughter and humor also have significant physical health benefits.  For example, in a study involving pain tolerance and muscle soreness, watching a comedic movie for just 30 minutes significantly and immediately reduced symptoms compared to a placebo group that viewed a documentary. 9

Cardiovascular Health

It is well-established that conditions such as depression and anger are detrimental to cardiovascular health, but whether or not the opposite is true, that is, if positive feelings are beneficial to cardiovascular health is still being studied.  One study did find that watching comedic films increased vascular function in healthy adults compared to those who watched a documentary. 10 In patients awaiting organ transplants, laughing yoga classes significantly improved cardiac function, and their moods improved immediately. 11  Another study involving over 20,000 people investigated the correlation between how often the participants laughed and their risk of developing heart disease and stroke.  Those who claimed to rarely or never laugh had significantly higher occurrences of both conditions than those who said that they laughed daily. 12  Daily laughter was also linked to lower mortality and heart disease in a Japanese study. 13

Immune System

Laughter and humor can also boost the immune system. In a study involving postpartum women, it was found that laughter therapy increased immune function significantly over placebo (14), and in another study investigating obese women, laughing therapy reduced the inflammatory markers, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6).  The participants’ blood glucose levels were also decreased. 15

 

Dr. Vazquez shares a story of a patient treated with humor

“A male teenager and his mother came to me for weight management issues. He was overweight and had a family history of diabetes and obesity. He performed well academically and was an avid fan of video games and water polo; however, he recognized that his health and weight were becoming an issue. Actually, his mother recognized this. In fact, it was his mother who answered the majority of my questions, interjected with stories and clinical caveats, while he sat there, and didn’t say much besides an occasional ‘yes’ or ‘no’ teenage head nod. 

I was able to speak with him more when his mother left the room, and he confirmed that he wanted to lose weight, eat healthy and become active again.  He had already taken initiative and was proactive about the process, eating meals that his mother prepared for him and getting more movement throughout the day.

From my assessment, he was on the right track!  I asked if his mother was helping with the process and he agreed.  I asked if she was helping “too much” and he finally cracked a smile.  When I was ready to deliver the treatment plan with both of them in the room, I asked a few more questions directed to the mother.  “Are you preparing healthy meals for him?” to which she animatedly said “Yes!”  I said “Great,” and immediately moved on to the next question, “Does he suffer from any hearing loss or impediment?”  Again, she vehemently denied, but now seemed curious as to my line of questions.  I again said “good” and asked my next question, “Do you remind him that he needs to eat healthy and exercise?”  Her eyes grew big and enthusiastically said “Oh yes, absolutely!”  I quickly asked “How many times a day?”  She paused and then answered, “A few.”  I smiled and asked again, “Does he suffer from any hearing loss or impediment?”  At that point, the mother began to laugh out loud and quickly covered her mouth.  Her son looked at me with open eyes and a big smile, surprised that I “caught” his mother in the act, so to speak. 

We continued to have a long discussion on how to best support her son, and for him to acknowledge and show appreciation.  There were both tears and laughter on her part, but by the time the visit was over, she gave me a big hug and delivered a heartfelt “Thank you.”  Her son shook my hand, with the same smile that never went away 10-15 minutes prior.  The visit was so much more than a plan addressing weight loss and lifestyle modifications, rather, addressing the relationships that either get in our way or support the process.”

Joseph Vazquez, ND

Assistant Professor and Attending Clinician, National University of Health Sciences

So, it would seem that laughter really is the best medicine! In the words of Patch Adams, “The most radical act anyone can commit is to be happy,” so let yourself be, and remember to take time to fill your days with laughter.

To find out more about the comprehensive and patient-centered plan NDs take, click here.

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Changing Your Career to Naturopathic Medicine

Changing Your Career to Naturopathic Medicine

Join the AANMC and Drs. Jill Jennings and Ginger Sweetan for a special webinar focused on making a career change to follow your dreams and become a naturopathic physician. It’s never too late to pursue your passion! Drs. Jennings and Sweetan will share their prior backgrounds in the military, real estate, and nursing, and speak about juggling family, school and career responsibilities.
 
Here’s what you can expect to hear during the webinar:

– How they successfully changed careers to pursue naturopathic medicine
– The difference an ND education has made in their lives
– How previous professional experience can contribute to success as an ND
– Tricks to balancing work and life responsibilities
– Advice for prospective ND students
– What a typical day looks like as an ND

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

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Put Your Health First with These Naturopathic Resolutions

After the holiday presents are unwrapped and the New Year’s glitter settles, the reality of a fresh start hits us. The new year offers limitless possibilities and new beginnings, how do we make the most of it? As you find yourself considering your vision for the year, where does your health fit into the equation? Doctors, professors, and other experts in the field of naturopathic medicine believe that setting wellness-driven resolutions will help you reach your full potential this year. Here are nine naturopathic new year’s resolutions you should consider adopting.

Resolution #1: Focus on the best ‘now’ possible

“Naturopathic medicine is about listening to your body and being in tune with the changes that need to be made to bring about health, wellbeing, and balance. Don’t wait to make a change that needs to be made—start today.”

One resolution that can have a resounding impact on health and wellbeing is the art of being present.

Mindfulness and being in the moment is a powerful tool for the following reasons:

  • It allows us to fully engage and focus on the opportunities in front of us.
  • It minimizes the stress that comes with the ‘what ifs’. We don’t have power to change the past—our power is in the now.
  • It minimizes the stress that comes from worrying about the future.
  • It allows for better connection with our body and environment.

When we are fully present and in tune with our body, we can better understand the root cause of an issue and the impact of any one thing on us.

I think of mindfulness like a muscle—the more we practice, the stronger and more natural we get at it.

4 Short Mindfulness Exercises

1.Mindful bites

Use the daily opportunity of eating to practice mindfulness! Take first couple of bites of any meal or snack you eat, and focus on the full experience—from the smell of the food, and how you feel as you anticipate eating, through to the textures and sensations as you eat. Apply gratitude to the nourishment and support it gives you to create a strong and functional body. Are the food choices we are making moving us closer or farther away from our health goals?

2. Too much screen time?

Give your brain a break! Instead of reflexively going to a device in the five minutes between meetings, or while waiting for something, try looking out your window and focusing on nature. Use mindfulness to give your brain a break rather than filling up every tiny space in your day by automatically reaching for a screen.

3. Scan your body

Scan your body, top to bottom for any sensations of discomfort or tension. Try softening any sensations of discomfort by breathing into those spaces, and filling them with healing light. Next, scan your body for areas of peace and relaxation.

4. Do one action mindfully

If none of the above work for you, pick one thing you do daily and choose to do it mindfully – paying attention to each step in the process and doing it all without judgment.

Wishing you all peace in the New Year.

JoAnn Yanez, ND, MPH, CAE

Executive Director, Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges (AANMC)

Resolution #2: Make self-care non-negotiable

“The best resolution is to commit to listening to and honoring your body’s needs. The work that we do as NDs requires an ability to be fully present with our patients, which becomes quite difficult if we don’t first take care of ourselves. Put another way, the more we can love and respect ourselves, the better we can help our patients do the same. In reality, this isn’t a resolution at all (everyone knows that most people give up on their’s within a few weeks, anyway) but rather a decision to make self-care non-negotiable.”

Robert Kachko, ND, LAc

2020 President, American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP)

Resolution #3: Reflect on what you need in order to practice to the best of your ability

“My practice is focused primarily on supportive cancer care. I remember a patient asking me several years ago, ‘What is it you would most like to do right now?’  I answered that I would like to ski in the mountains of British Columbia for the first time. She replied, ‘Then what is stopping you? We will always think we’re too busy, or it’s too expensive, or some other excuse we tell ourselves. There will always be a reason not to. But I promise you that you will not regret it when you’re there, or when you look back on your life.’

Practicing naturopathic medicine takes a lot of work, compassion, focus and integrity. In order to practice to the best of our abilities and truly love the life we live, we must support ourselves by spending time with loved ones, being in nature or however we best recharge – what would you most like to do in 2020? “

Mark Fontes, ND

Chair, Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors (CAND)

Resolution #4: Enjoy nature, find time for self-reflection

“With so much chaos in the world and a global sense of being overwhelmed, my new year’s resolution is to spend more time in silence and reflection and enjoying nature. My goal is to practice the art of intention and to remind myself (and my patients) every day of the power of the mind and the ability of the mind to heal. I am excited about the possibilities!”

Iva Lloyd, BScH, BCPP, ND

President, World Naturopathic Federation

Resolution #5: Don’t bite off more than you can chew, know when to say ‘no’

“My resolution is to not bite off more than I can chew! That relates to all aspects of life. Choosing healthy food portions, healthy work life balance, and sometimes saying ‘no’ to what seems like an important new endeavor to get involved in. There are so many opportunities to participate in with inspired, capable people doing good work! My goal is to keep laser-focused on the priorities I set out for me, in the year ahead.”

Michelle Simon, PhD, ND

President, Institute for Natural Medicine

Resolution #6: Don’t put off healthy habits

“My resolution is to develop one new habit that is good for my health that I’ve put off and stick with it, and to rekindle one interesting hobby—perhaps playing music.”

Fraser Smith, MATD, ND

President, Assistant Dean, Association of Accredited Naturopathic Medical Colleges (AANMC), National University of Health Sciences

Resolution #7: Make time for yourself

“Clear the mind and make time for self:

  • On New Year’s Day, spend at least two hours reflecting on how to incorporate some small, healthy habits into your lifestyle.
  • Spend at least one day away each year with no television, phone, or distractions; this was a common practice by beloved Maya Angelou.
  • Dedicate at least 10 minutes a day to meditation, prayer, or mantras.
  • Spend time in nature for 10 minutes a day or at minimum once a week (e.g. walking and observing your surroundings and the environment).

Be clear on your goals:

  • Write down one to two health goals for the year and look at them each day. Place these goals in a prominent place to be reminded daily (e.g. next to your nightstand, bathroom mirror, etc.). Reminders and reinforcements are key to resolutions.
  • Profess your goal out loud. Sharing with others helps to create accountability.

Be reasonable and love yourself:

  • It’s important to make baby steps towards your goals and also to be kind to yourself if you make a mistake or are not on track. Slander towards oneself is a self-defeating affirmation that makes it more difficult to reach your goal. Reflect, review, reaffirm, make a plan, and move on!
  • Remember that life is a marathon not a race; thus the small incremental health steps you make daily are much more impactful than short-term gains.”
Jaquel Patterson, ND, MBA

2019 President, American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP)

Resolution #8: Resolve not to make resolutions! 

“Resolve not to make resolutions! Rather, make the effort to improve your ability to set health related goals and achieve them. In practicing sports medicine, it has become apparent that those with effective goal setting skills, generally speaking, have improved long term athletic success and in doing so have inadvertently learned the art of resiliency.

How are these athletes any different from you and I? There are two factors at play. They are highly motivated to achieve performance and also excellent at defining performance indicators (through goal setting) that allow for successful outcomes. However, not only do their goals fit the principles of ‘SMART’ goals (i.e. specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timely), but athletes tend to add to their goal setting technique.

Many successful athletes have a training log. This tactic forces a goal to be recorded. In doing so, the athlete has established a contract with themselves, resulting in accountability, which helps drive improvement in performance.

Another key benefit of logging information is that it allows for the ongoing evaluation of a goal. An athlete’s training journal provides a way to review historical change and more clearly identify key challenges that may be barriers to success. These challenges can then be addressed quickly, leading to more timely success in goal achievement.

The final aspect that athletes take into consideration is a factor of reality when participating in sport—injury. Physical performance can be considerably influenced through the process of injury and subsequent therapy. As such, the willingness to have reversibility of goals allows for the unexpected in life to occur, while concurrently building the resiliency that is required to reset a training plan and, subsequently, build a new set of ‘SMART’ goals.

By engaging yourself in three additional goal setting tactics (recording, ongoing evaluation, and reversibility) you are positioning yourself for ongoing success, not only at the start of a new calendar year, but consistently over the course of life.”

Lowell Greib, MSc, ND, CISSN

Past Chair, Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors (CAND)

Resolution #9: Be mindful, every day

“Practice 10 minutes of meditation every day.”

Joshua Goldenberg, ND

President, GastroANP

Resolution #10: Prioritize family

“In this day and age, the speed and reality of our day-to-day lives just seems to get faster each day—email, social media, or the logistics of family schedules—all pulling us away from the most important things in life: quality time with family and self-care.

This year, I resolve the following: to make the health and well-being of my family the priority.  To commit to regular meditation and nature time, self-care, and humor with my family every day. I resolve to make the health and well-being of my family and myself the top priority—before the Facebook feed, the online games or apps, the endless email, or the to-do lists that just get longer. Set it all aside and laugh and give health to yourself and to your family. Breathe life into that dream and vision for yourself. Take the plunge with me!”

Tabatha Parker, ND

Board President, Executive Director , Natural Doctors International, Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine

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2019 Year in Review

A Year of Academics, Scholarship and Community Outreach

Each and every year, the field of naturopathic medical education advances significantly. We are proud to recap the advances our seven accredited naturopathic medical schools made in academics, scholarship and community outreach during 2019. Looking ahead, there is a lot to be excited for as well!

Click the tabs above to read messages from each of the schools.

A Year of Inclusion and Equity

Bastyr University
Campuses in San Diego, California & Seattle, Washington

As Bastyr University concludes its 41st year, we reflect on some of the milestones and achievements that have furthered our mission to create a more healthful world for all:

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Training. Bastyr welcomed Dr. Kortet Mensah as the inaugural Associate Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI). Starting in fall quarter of 2019, all faculty, staff and students at the Kenmore campus participated in DEI trainings, which included community-based conversations about levels of oppression, factors that contribute to and derail oppression, and strategies to advance inclusive diversity and equity at Bastyr and beyond. DEI training at Bastyr University California will begin in winter quarter of 2020.

Health Equity Speaker Series. The Center for Social Justice and Diversity also launched a Health Equity Speaker Series this fall, with its first topic titled “What is Health? The Need for Health Equity.” Students who helped facilitate this event are a part of the Center’s Student Leadership Certificate Program, designed to support students in developing skills in the areas of professional leadership, social justice, and cultural humility. The one-year program complements existing degree programs through its focus on practical and engaged leadership skills

Support for Susan G. Komen. On November 3, the Bastyr University California Sports Medicine Club provided services in the survivor tent at the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. Students practiced physical medicine modalities such as light massage and stretching, taping, icing, trigger point therapy and cupping. In addition, ND students and residents provided health screenings in the main event area for the 9,000 participants. Students enjoyed giving back to the local community and educating participants about Bastyr University Clinic’s integrative oncology services.

2019 marked 100 years of licensure in the United States — a milestone achieved through the tireless efforts of many individuals. Our 141 newest ND graduates join this great community and look forward to bringing more innovations in naturopathic medicine into the new decade!

To learn more about Bastyr, click here.

A Year of Commitment and Excellence

Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

The Boucher Institute would like to once again congratulate its students for outperforming the average NPLEX results by a healthy margin. We credit the ability and commitment of our faculty that continue to be second to none in terms of preparing our students to become excellent, compassionate doctors.  BINM would also like to congratulate the school’s team of students who once again, came first at the NMSA cup competition in Portland, OR last August.

Our academic team will be expanding in order to support the school’s growth and new programs. Additionally, we have invested in developing new and exciting fundraising sources to benefit students and ensure that our tuition costs remain as steady as possible over the longer term.

New programs are being built to ensure continued graduate success and employment opportunities for BINM graduates. Our core program will continue to teach our students the benefits of practicing collaborative medicine, and we are in process of creating relationships with other higher education institutions to broaden student opportunities in areas like research and recruitment. Boucher graduates are grounded in the roots of the naturopathic medicine and its supporting science, because it represents the soundest form of sustainable medicine. We look forward to what will be an exciting 2020.

To learn more about BINM, click here.

A Year of Research and Innovation

Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

For CCNM, 2019 can be characterized by the terrific strides the College has made in research and innovation. Our efforts this year focused on a few key areas.

The microbiome. More than just a buzzword, the microbiome plays a significant role in maintaining our health and preventing disease. CCNM embarked in a landmark study to explore the interplay between our environment and the microbiome in mothers and newborns; particularly, how exposure to pharmaceutical drugs and environmental toxins affect health outcomes during pregnancy.

Lab testing. CCNM launched a high-quality, evidence-informed webinar series in September to examine the value of laboratory testing in clinical practice, and support NDs and other health-care practitioners in diagnostic decision-making. The first two webinars are on the topics of hematology, kidney and urinalysis.

Student scholarship. Now in its second year, the Student Innovation Fund is a grant competition that nurtures student-led research at CCNM. This year’s winners are currently assessing the impact of naturopathic care being provided to patients with fibromyalgia at the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic, CCNM’s academic medical centre.

It’s no surprise that CCNM is considered a hub of naturopathic research. We look forward to even more discovery in 2020!

To learn more about CCNM, click here.

A Year of New Opportunities

National University of Health Sciences
Chicago, Illinois

National University of Health Sciences continues to expand its Clinical Clerkship program for naturopathic medicine students. Throughout 2019, NUHS added three new clinical opportunities. These internships at the Aurora Clinic, Salvation Army Clinic in Chicago and the Center for Integral Health in Lombard have unique patient populations that can help students prepare for various types of practice and provide hands-on, real-world experience for our student clinicians. They also have the added benefit of being located in the Chicago area near campus.

As part of a homeopathic rotation at the Center for Integral Health in Lombard, students are able to work alongside Timothy Fior, MD, who is also a lecturer in Clinical Sciences at NUHS and Lisa Krebs, ND, an NUHS alumnae. “Students will come away with the confidence and skills to accurately use this important modality in practice,” Dr. Krebs said.

At the NUHS Whole Health Center in Aurora, NUHS has added a ND faculty clinician who will attend shifts at the clinic each week with ND interns. NUHS also added an ND faculty clinician to supervise students at the Salvation Army clinic in Chicago. This supervision allows interns to provide more naturopathic modalities at the clinic such as basic bloodwork and constitutional hydrotherapy treatments.

Faculty members look forward to working with students as they continue to take advantage of these opportunities in 2020. For more information about clinical internship opportunities visit the NUHS website.

To learn more about NUHS, click here.

A Year of New Leadership and Advancement

National University of Natural Medicine
Portland, Oregon

NUNM welcomed our new president Dr. Christine Girard, a 1997 NUNM graduate who is already building on NUNM’s history of thinking and healing holistically. She’s excited about NUNM’s role in the intersection between naturopathic medicine and public health, and recently shared an update in AANMC’s November newsletter.

Through our 2019 acquisition of IPSL Institute for Global Learning, we have expanded the opportunities for students to participate in service-learning programs as part of their education. We also now offer two international master’s programs, giving current and future students greater opportunities to become advocates for social justice. We’re very excited for what this new partnership has in store for 2020!

Next year, we look forward to our students continuing to bring integrative health care to our local communities through programs at our academic health centers. NUNM’s new shared clinical rotations allow students studying in both the ND and Chinese medicine programs to mix the two approaches in practice, providing patients with more integrative tracks to health. Our newest sites, opening in 2020, will be located in residential facilities in the Portland metro area where access to holistic care is less available. This model of integration has proven to be effective at maintaining patients’ engagement with their care regimens, and we’re excited to enhance patient outcomes and student learning through these new sites!

To learn more about NUNM, click here.

A Year of Transformation and Innovation

Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine
Phoenix, Arizona

In Fall of 2019, SCNM announced plans to launch two 100% online Master of Science in Nutrition degrees – the Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition (MSCN) and the Master of Science in Nutrition Business Leadership (MSNBL). Both programs will seat their first class in April of 2020. The MSCN will educate and inspire the next generation of leaders and practitioners in the field of clinical nutrition and the MSNBL will educate and inspire current and future leaders to grow the global natural products industry. Both programs will equip graduates with evidence-based and sustainable practices that safely, ethically, and effectively enhance the health and well-being of the people and communities they serve.

Additionally, SCNM is in the early building stages of The Ric Scalzo Institute for Botanical Research. This state-of-the-art molecular biology and phytochemistry laboratory will work in collaboration with the natural products industry and other academic institutions to develop new products and improve existing botanical therapeutics through scientific exploration grounded in herbalism’s rich tradition. Scheduled to open in 2020, the Institute will conduct analytical testing, cellular and molecular biology assays, and metabolomic testing. Furthermore, the Ric Scalzo Institute for Botanical Research will expand research opportunities for students.

To learn more about SCNM, click here.

A Year of Change and Celebration

University of Bridgeport School of Naturopathic Medicine
Bridgeport, Connecticut

In October, the College of Health Sciences hosted more than 150 statewide experts and healthcare leaders for its inaugural symposium, Building Bridges: Implementing Healthcare Solutions to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Chronic Pain in Connecticut.

In March 2019 the University of Bridgeport announced that the School of Naturopathic Medicine will be closing its doors, based on a wide variety of factors, including a restructure of the University. The students enrolled as of the spring semester will complete the teach-out, with the last class graduating in May 2022.  In the meantime, however, we are celebrating every success and appreciating all the little things that are often taken for granted. Each event, including the Back to School Barbeque, Philosophy Day, and the Thanksgiving Pot Luck takes on new meaning.  We have had so many folks reaching out and helping us to champion our profession and the level of achievement that we have reached in the last few years.

Learn More About Becoming a Naturopathic Doctor

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