PTSD and the Six Principles of Naturopathic Medicine

Join Radley Ramdhan, ND, MsAc, former Specialist in the United States Army Corp of Engineers, New York Army National Guard for an informative session on naturopathic approaches to PTSD. Hear about his firsthand journey as a doctor and veteran in navigating traumatic issues with patients.

*Webinar does not qualify for CE

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About the Presenter

Radley Ramdhan, ND, MsAc completed his Bachelor of Science in Biology at Barry University in Miami, Florida. He earned his Master of Science in Acupuncture and Doctorate in Naturopathic Medicine from the University of Bridgeport School of Naturopathic Medicine (UBSNM) in Bridgeport, Connecticut. While pursuing his studies, he served as a Specialist in the United States Army Corp of Engineers, New York Army National Guard for six years. It was through his military experience that he developed a special interest in working with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) patients, and as a result completed his thesis on understanding and treating PTSD using a naturopathic approach. Dr. Radley served one deployment in support of Operation Inherent Resolve in Kuwait and Iraq.

He has co-authored two articles published by Naturopathic Doctor News and Review :

PTSD: Using a Naturopathic Approach to Understand & Treat the Disorder
Traumatic Brain Injury: Clinical Applications & Plausible Interventions

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*The information you submit in this registration will be used to inform you of updates to this event and will enroll you in the AANMC newsletter. The AANMC values your privacy. Please see how we protect your data in our privacy policy .

Therapeutic Benefits of Pets

We all know that eating fruits and vegetables, exercising, controlling stress, and getting enough sleep each night are vital components to overall health and longevity. But what if you found out you could further reduce your risk of heart disease and death without limiting carbs or taking another supplement? What if the same thing could reduce the risk of your kids developing environmental allergies, and improve mental health and well-being? Interested? Then it may be time to check out a local pet adoption event because these benefits (and more) are all associated with pet ownership!

“I can’t imagine life without pets. Animals provide unconditional love and acceptance. There is no way to describe all that these wonderful companions give to us.”

Gaia Mather, ND

Graduate and Assistant Professor, National University of Natural Medicine

According to a 2018 national survey, 68% of US households own a pet.1 Pet ownership comes with more than just unconditional love and endless entertainment. Additional health and wellness benefits of pet ownership include:

Improved cardiovascular risk and lower mortality

Pets are often responsible for filling their owner’s heart with love, but studies have also demonstrated that owning a pet can have added cardiovascular benefits and may even reduce the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease (as well as other causes). A 12-year long Swedish study involving 3.4 million people aged 40-80 showed that dog owners had a lower risk of death over the course of the study.1 Pet ownership has also been associated in a number of studies with reductions in cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, improved cholesterol patterns, as well as increased heart rate variability and autonomic function.2

Reduced risk of allergies and stronger overall immune system

The term “immunity” refers to not one specific thing, but a collection of mechanisms employed by the body in an effort to guard against agents in the environment. This includes microorganisms, foods, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, environmental allergens such as pollen and animal hair/dander. Pets can be a great source of a number of these, and interacting with a pet may affect immunity levels. Researchers have hypothesized that pets increase exposure to a greater number of allergens and other microbes. Published research has shown that growing up with a cat or dog can lead to fewer allergies later in life.3 Further research demonstrates that having a pet in the home can actually lower a child’s likelihood of developing related allergies by as much as 33%.4 The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology revealed that children exposed early on to animals tend to develop stronger immune systems overall.4

Enhanced stress management capabilities

Pet therapy is becoming increasingly popular and is used in a variety of ways. Many people rely on animals for support, whether in an official capacity as a trained service animal, or in the role of a house pet or registered emotional support animal.

“I know plenty of people whose lives would be significantly different if they didn’t have their companion animals helping them through life: a woman whose dog would alert her when she was about to have a seizure, and people whose assistance dogs help modulate their anxiety levels to function more fully in the world.”

Gaia Mather, ND

Graduate and Assistant Professor, National University of Natural Medicine

Veterans, children and students are just a few groups who have shown that people can experience less stress when a pet is around. A 12-month study of veterans with PTSD symptoms who were involved in a therapeutic dog ownership program revealed that participants experienced significant reductions in symptoms of post-traumatic stress, perceived stress, isolation, and self-judgment accompanied by significant increases in self-compassion.5

“As someone living with PTSD, animals have been a great source of comfort and truly a gift on my healing journey. I started riding at the age of five and cannot imagine my life without a horse. Just being in the presence of my horses, I feel a sense of peace and tranquility that heals my body, mind and soul. Horseback riding and being in nature allows me to re-balance and reconnect with myself and reduces feelings of depression and anxiety.”

Holly Wurtz, ND

Graduate, National University of Health Sciences

Children often have less developed emotional and physiological responses to stress, as well as reduced cognitive coping mechanisms to self-regulate their stress response.6 In a study of typically developing children between the ages of 7 and 12, it was found that perceived stress during a novel stressor is buffered in the presence of a dog.6 University students are another group who experience a good deal of stress. In a study of pet therapy, students experienced a statistically significant reduction in stress markers, including stress as measured on the state trait anxiety inventory and blood pressure when interacting with therapeutic animals.7

Pet therapy may also benefit the workplace. Stress is a major contributor to employee absenteeism, poor morale and burnout, and results in significant loss of productivity and resources.8 Researchers examined how the presence of dogs impacted worker stress throughout the course of a work day. They found that dogs in the workplace may buffer the impact of stress and make the job more satisfying for those with whom they come into contact.9

For some, time with pets is the ultimate stress reliever. “As a practitioner, business owner and mom, my stress levels are inherently high. Cats make a huge difference in helping me recover from stress, giving me a chance to take a break and be in the present moment.”

Doni Wilson, ND, CNS, CPM

Graduate, Bastyr University

NDs share how they incorporate the therapeutic benefits of animals in patient care

“One of my patients was a depressed mother of two small children. Myself along with her other therapists, suggested that she get a dog.  She rescued a boxer and within a few months, her outlook on life and connection with her children improved significantly.”

Marizelle Arce, ND

Graduate, University of Bridgeport School of Naturopathic Medicine

“A 60-year-old woman who complained of stress and anxiety, especially related to her health, got a cat. In taking care of her cat, her anxiety levels decreased, and she felt a sense of companionship. Many people feel isolated and alone, which actually becomes a stressor and causes further health issues. Having a pet can make a huge difference for these patients.”

Doni Wilson, ND, CNS, CPM

Graduate, Bastyr University

“I ask patients about pet ownership and find that pets often have a significant role in people’s lives.  Many pet owners view their pets as family members.  For example, I saw a patient who was experiencing a high level of stress due to work and a recent divorce. As part of his wellness plan, I suggested that he make time to take his beloved golden retriever to a dog park.  He started going to the dog park on a daily basis and felt more relaxed and better able to cope with life’s circumstances.”

Holly Wurtz, ND

Graduate, National University of Health Sciences

Decreased risk of obesity and augmented activity level

Despite intensive campaigns to promote awareness and lifestyle interventions for obesity, obesity and physical inactivity continue to climb, reaching epidemic proportions. In the US, over 60% of adults are overweight or obese, and fewer than 50% achieve recommended amount of physical activity.2 Studies have found that people who walk dogs tend to have lower incidence of obesity and are 53% more likely to meet recommendations for moderate to vigorous physical activity.2 The benefits are not limited to adults. The US has seen a threefold increase in childhood obesity since 1970 with around 20% of children aged 6-19 being considered obese.10 However, research has shown that for younger children, the odds of being overweight or obese were cut in half for those whose family owned a dog versus those who did not.2

Fosters social interaction

Creating, developing, and maintaining social connections with others is an important part of maintaining our long-term health. However, for many people, this is no easy feat. Social anxiety, communication difficulties, and lack of opportunity can all be challenges in forming social bonds. Pets can be great social networkers, helping to facilitate new connections, building support and rapport with others. A 2015 study found that people who were pet owners were over 60% more likely to meet and get to know the people in their neighborhood.11 Although dog owners were the most likely to make new friends while spending time walking their dogs, other types of pets such as cats, rabbits, and even snakes can support a sense of connection as well.2

NDs share how they’ve become involved in the community because of their love for animals

Dr. Mather has volunteered at the Oregon Humane Society with her niece.  She adopted one of her two cats while volunteering.

Gaia Mather, ND

Graduate ad Assistant Professor, National University of Natural Medicine

Dr. Arce and her husband donate toys and blankets to the Yonkers animal shelter. They also volunteer their time to the Mount Vernon animal shelter and Wildlife SOS in an effort to help people realize the importance of rescuing animals. Dr. Arce and her husband are pictured below with their two dogs, both rescued from North Shore Animal League. They also have two cats which were also rescued.

Marizelle Arce, ND

Graduate, University of Bridgeport School of Naturopathic Medicine

“I have five cats, three dogs and two fabulous horses. My furry companions add to the richness of my life. I have volunteered with pet rescues for over 20 years and currently work with two rescues, FurKeeps Cat Rescue and Adopt a River Cat Rescue. I foster cats and kittens until they can find their forever homes and am very privileged to work with a remarkable group of people in rescue who are dedicated to helping both animals and people. We encounter many situations when working in pet rescue in which people need temporary homes for their animals due to unfortunate circumstances such as illness, job loss, domestic violence or homelessness, for example.  We also connect people with resources in the community to help provide support.  It is very rewarding to be able to help my community and be of service to both animals and people in need.”

Holly Wurtz, ND

Graduate, National University of Health Sciences

“I run a not-for-profit organization called Cat Care. Our mission is to care for feral cats in Port Jefferson on Long Island. We also care for a colony of 25 cats on my property. We also have a dachshund and a snake.”

Doni Wilson, ND, CNS, CPM

Graduate, Bastyr University

In summary, pets can serve a multitude of therapeutic functions in addition to being a loving member of our family. The decision to bring a pet into a home should not be taken lightly, however. Pets are a lifelong commitment – so make sure you research care, temperament and lifespans of the animals you are considering, and adopt from reputable locations or rescue organizations. By picking the right pet for your family, you will not only improve your health, but the health of your pet as well!

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